Fastest rc car in the world! 208 mph!!

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate
links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
Good Lord........Thats so dang fast. Seems like this year those numbers are going to continue to tick up quite a bit. So awesome
Lipo manufacturers started customizing specifically for speed runs last year and this is an example of what can be done. I'm sure they will all be working tirelesly now, attempting to find the formula that puts them on top.
 
You could tell he realized right away he’s going to be news, started thanking the sponsors and what he used for the build. He was so excited trying to contain it then went all over the place trying not to fumble good lord that thing is fast!
Kept say new camera old but new lol good for him
 
Guiness requires back to back average passes and an actually accurate method of measuring velocity(GNSS has a large tolerance at those speeds in comparison to my dragy for example).

Astounding what some of these cars are capable of either way.
 
Guiness requires back to back average passes and an actually accurate method of measuring velocity(GNSS has a large tolerance at those speeds in comparison to my dragy for example).

Astounding what some of these cars are capable of either way.
To be in the official Guiness records, it has to go thorugh traps, but in the rc world, we accept the GNSS as enough proof. He went 202 mph on his previous run, so it's very conceivable that with minor adjustments, he was able to achieve 208.
 
A calculated 6 mph on a 15-20 lb rig at 200mph is an entire horsepower variable, I'll take some of those batteries! :LOL:
He had issues with the tires on the 202 mph run which caused it to get a bit out of shape. New tires and a straight pass made for the record breaker.
 
Guiness requires back to back average passes and an actually accurate method of measuring velocity(GNSS has a large tolerance at those speeds in comparison to my dragy for example).

Astounding what some of these cars are capable of either way.
I'm not sure if that's true. At the last ROSSA event in Wales, we were able to witness several passes through the traps where the driver had a GSM020 on board and, IIRC, every single one matched the speed through the traps all the way up to 183mph. I'd be willing to concede 1 maybe 2mph tops that the GNSS is off, but I have yet to see any evidence to suggest that it would be more than that.
 
That’s how a tolerance range works, gentlemen it could be anywhere from nominal to +/- 10mph depending on variables if the unit is even close to 5 percent accurate. This is an impressive feat no doubt, but I will say that these high school point and shoot radar guns that were clocking you throw “85mph” had a tendency to lean towards the USL!

These micro cheap GPS units are absolutely not used anywhere full 1 scale racing/timing. You have a limited sample size, in six sigma quality we require a minimum of 30-50 data points to understand bell curve/capability.
 
Last edited:
That’s how a tolerance range works, gentlemen it could be anywhere from nominal to +/- 10mph depending on variables if the unit is even close to 5 percent accurate.

These micro cheap GPS units are absolutely not used anywhere full 1 scale racing/timing. You have a limited sample size, in six sigma quality we require a minimum of 30-50 sample data points to understand bell curve/capability.
If you can reliably demonstrate a tolerance of +/- 10mph or 5% on these GNSS units, I'm all eyes. Until then, the accuracy validated via calibrated speed traps tells me these things are accurate to within 1-2mph (I've only seen them match the reading of the speed traps within <1mph, but I'm willing to concede a 1-2mph variance until proven otherwise).
 
I believe it’s a “behind the scenes secret” where they don’t show discrepancies, although Talbot had 2 different micro GPS units on his 100+ mph sausage on real grass runs and they were within a couple mph of each other when shown in video. So you can figure out as the top speed doubles, the accuracy range will at “least” follow.

Next spring I plan to grab a gnss and run with my dragy with a ~100 mph gearing setup on the infraction before selling. Collect some data points and compare, problem with dragy on a smaller scale is it requires a smart app device if you gather live first person video.
 
I believe it’s a “behind the scenes secret” where they don’t show discrepancies, although Talbot had 2 different micro GPS units on his 100+ mph sausage on real grass runs and they were within a couple mph of each other when shown in video. So you can figure out as the top speed doubles, the accuracy range will at “least” follow.

Next spring I plan to grab a gnss and run with my dragy with a ~100 mph gearing setup on the infraction before selling. Collect some data points and compare, problem with dragy on a smaller scale is it requires a smart app device if you gather live first person video.
Ok, so...just to make sure that I'm tracking you here, you have nothing that demonstrates any inaccuracy of these GNSS units, but you believe it's a "behind the scenes secret".

When KT was running his sausage out on the soccer field, he was using a several year old and beat to snot SkyRC GSM015 that won't zero out anymore and always displays 2mph after a reset and a relatively new GSM020...and you believe that, because these two devices that can't even agree on what 0mph is and register top speeds that are 2mph apart (a complete mystery as to what is causing the 2mph discrepancy...), this demonstrates that the new GSM020 is inaccurate and, furthermore, that you can then extrapolate this to higher speeds. All this while ignoring the fact that multiple GSM020s that were used by various drivers at ROSSA last year all registered the same speed that the professionally set up and calibrated traps measured to within 1mph or less.

So either the traps at ROSSA are also inaccurate and the GNSS and traps repeatedly registered the same speed by sheer coincidence (at which point I'd ask the question what the point of the traps that cost $1000 and up is) or, the traps at ROSSA are accurate and the GNSS repeatedly registered the same speed to within 1mph or less...again, by sheer coincidence.

Well I'm convinced.

I'm larking of course. I'm being droll. If comparing the GNSS to calibrated traps doesn't validate its accuracy to you, at least in terms of measuring top speed, then nothing will. But, interestingly, you're willing to accept the 2mph difference shown between an old thrashed out unit that won't zero out and a new GNSS that will, as indicative of a secret inaccuracy in these devices that is only being talked about "behind the scenes".

Had it been a one-off, I'd be easier to persuade that it might not be that accurate or, at the very least, that I have insufficient data to say with any degree of certainty But it wasn't. It was repeated several times. I don't have hundreds of data points but, that's sufficient validation of their accuracy for me for now.

Just to be clear so there's no confusion, I'm saying nothing about their accuracy for drag pulls as I haven't seen it compared to professional traps set up for drag. All I'm saying is that it's easily close enough in terms of measuring top speed. If I were to hazard a guess as to its accuracy when it comes to drag pulls, I suspect you'll see differences in ET of several hundredths of a second compared to traps, but consistently less than a tenth of a second. This is just speculation so I'll be curious to see how it does.
 
Old Thread: Hello . There have been no replies in this thread for 90 days.
Content in this thread may no longer be relevant.
Perhaps it would be better to start a new thread instead.
Back
Top