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speeding_Infraction

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Arrma RC's
  1. Infraction
Had to purchase a new ESC and I've been reading random threads on here regarding amperage, amp draw, c ratings and whatnot. I do know that higher C rating = bigger punch. Is there a maximum C rating? I was looking at buying these (HOOVO 3S 11.1V Lipo Battery 5500mAh 120C RC Battery Hardcase with EC5 Connector for RC Car Truggy Boat Truck Racing Models 2 Packs https://a.co/d/gGU8vjT) but don't know if they'll be too much for the spectrum 150A ESC I bought (it is the oem replacement for the infraction V2).
 
There is no such thing as too much "C". Use as much as you like. Keep in mind that actual C rating will differ from published C rating as there is no standardized method for that. So manufacturers will often inflate those numbers. Actually C rating affects how effectively Lipos can deliver the power and how badly (or "goodly") they can resist voltage sag under load.

Per my personal experience I can't recommend those Hoovo's. The old models were good but the new ones suck.
 
I run 135c 3s lipos with a stock blx 100 esc with no worries myself so can't imagine it being a problem, but ill let others with more experience chime in.
 
Hector is quite right. C rating can almost mean Crap Rating these days with all of the budget batteries. The higher the C rating though, the more amp draw the battery is  CAPABLE of delivering, but keep in mind amp draw is not a push situation, it is a pull situation, as in your battery will only provide what your motor is pulling.

I tend to steer well clear of bargain bin batteries off Amazon as they almost always seem to be garbage. Name brand batteries tend to be more honest with their ratings and more importantly, the cells are more closely matched which gives a longer battery life.
 
There is no such thing as too much "C". Use as much as you like. Keep in mind that actual C rating will differ from published C rating as there is no standardized method for that. So manufacturers will always inflate those numbers. Actually C rating affects how effectively Lipos can deliver the power and how badly (or "goodly") they can resist voltage sag under load.

Per my personal experience I can't recommend those Hoovo's. The old models were good but the new ones suck.
Fixed.

There isn't a single lipo seller on the planet that actually has the true C rate listed on their packs.
 
Fixed.

There isn't a single lipo seller on the planet that actually has the true C rate listed on their packs.

Im guilty of this too but I’m trying to bring the ratings to more realistic numbers. A very powerful cell usually delivers between 30-35C

It’s difficult.. I’ve lost some sales because I don’t put exaggerated C ratings on my batteries. Even owners of the high end LiPo brands advised me not to rate the batteries so low.

There also isn’t a universally accepted standard

I’m hoping as my brand grows and people see the capabilities of a battery labeled 50C that it makes them start to question the C ratings more.
 
Fixed.

There isn't a single lipo seller on the planet that actually has the true C rate listed on their packs.
Whose to say any 120c battery out there - budget or premium - isn't capable of being fully discharged in 30 seconds? You just have to think like the marketing execs, then any pack can be capable of 1000 amps. At least one time.

For all we know, hoovo, zeee, and maxamps marketing execs could be thinking exactly that: "hey, we said the battery could put out 1000 amps, but we never said you'd be able to use it again after though".

Without standardization, the numbers high or low are meaningless. Even people out there calculating "real C", there is still a huge gap in testing revolving around the various different testing parameters everyone uses, how many cycles the cells can survive at "real C" discharges, or what the IR numbers look like after a "real C" discharge--do they go permanently go up? Do internal solder joints melt after two of those cycles? Just too many variables and questions.
Im guilty of this too but I’m trying to bring the ratings to more realistic numbers. A very powerful cell usually delivers between 30-35C

It’s difficult.. I’ve lost some sales because I don’t put exaggerated C ratings on my batteries. Even owners of the high end LiPo brands advised me not to rate the batteries so low.

There also isn’t a universally accepted standard

I’m hoping as my brand grows and people see the capabilities of a battery labeled 50C that it makes them start to question the C ratings more.
Honestly I'd be fine with lipo companies labeling their products rated for amperage. Like 100 amp lipos, 200 amps lipos, and 600 amps speed run lipos, or something. That's what we do with ESCs and motors. Why not lipos?

Then I'd know exactly what I'm getting when I buy. If I have a 150amp esc, I'd better be getting the 200amp lipo.
 
Last edited:
Whose to say any 120c battery out there - budget or premium - isn't capable of being fully discharged in 30 seconds? You just have to think like the marketing execs, then any pack can be capable of 1000 amps. At least one time.

For all we know, hoovo, zeee, and maxamps marketing execs could be thinking exactly that: "hey, we said the battery could put out 1000 amps, but we never said you'd be able to use it again after though".

Without standardization, the numbers high or low are meaningless. Even people out there calculating "real C", there is still a huge gap in testing revolving around the various different testing parameters everyone uses, how many cycles the cells can survive at "real C" discharges, or what the IR numbers look like after a "real C" discharge--do they go permanently go up? Do internal solder joints melt after two of those cycles? Just too many variables and questions.

Honestly I'd be fine with lipo companies labeling their products rated for amperage. Like 100 amp lipos, 200 amps lipos, and 600 amps speed run lipos, or something. That's what we do with ESCs and motors. Why not lipos?

Then I'd know exactly what I'm getting when I buy. If I have a 150amp esc, I'd better be getting the 200amp lipo.

Nah I'm still convinced that they play pin the tail on the donkey when they choose what c rate to put on a lipo.
 
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