Kraton Front Diff fluid

GBR

Active Member
Messages
4
Reaction score
1
Arrma RC's
I'm a newly, but I'm enjoying bashing my new Kraton. Have read on the forum about changing the diff fluids to change the power distribution and I have a question. I see every one changes the middle and front fluid and I don't see rational of changing both. If I would to put thicker fluid up front the power should be transferred to the rear, so why mess with the center diff? Please pass on your wisdom. Thx
 

Arrmagetem

Well-Known Member
Messages
60
Reaction score
37
Arrma RC's
  1. Granite
I
I'm a newly, but I'm enjoying bashing my new Kraton. Have read on the forum about changing the diff fluids to change the power distribution and I have a question. I see every one changes the middle and front fluid and I don't see rational of changing both. If I would to put thicker fluid up front the power should be transferred to the rear, so why mess with the center diff? Please pass on your wisdom. Thx
I was curious about this also.
 

83N

Well-Known Member
Messages
139
Reaction score
48
Location
UK
Arrma RC's
Posted this a few times today but you may find it useful:

Look here for a guide on diff tuning.

HTH
 

slpcrf450x

Well-Known Member
Messages
177
Reaction score
87
Arrma RC's
The fluid thickness controls how much "differential" action you have. The front or rear diff fluid will change how much power is transferred between the left and right tire. If you like to spin cookies and the inside tires balloon then thicker fluids will help take more of that energy from the inside tires and transfer it to the outside tires. The center diff only controls power between the front and rear, not left and right. If you are hammering the throttle and the front tires balloon then thicker center fluid will provide more resistance through the diff transferring more power to the rear.
There are times where ballooning isn't bad, for example if you are trying to race you would want thick enough fluid that you don't waste power through the front but also thin enough that it doesn't just try to wheelie every time you hit the throttle.
 

jk420

Well-Known Member
Messages
314
Reaction score
98
Arrma RC's
  1. Granite
Lol I have not changed the diff fluid in the back but the front is 50k and middle is 100k. Like the way it drives now. Probably will change out the back diff fluid when I get up a little more money for the diff fluid lol.
 

crankestein

Well-Known Member
Messages
445
Reaction score
307
Location
Area 54
Arrma RC's
  1. Talion
The fluid thickness controls how much "differential" action you have. The front or rear diff fluid will change how much power is transferred between the left and right tire. If you like to spin cookies and the inside tires balloon then thicker fluids will help take more of that energy from the inside tires and transfer it to the outside tires. The center diff only controls power between the front and rear, not left and right. If you are hammering the throttle and the front tires balloon then thicker center fluid will provide more resistance through the diff transferring more power to the rear.
There are times where ballooning isn't bad, for example if you are trying to race you would want thick enough fluid that you don't waste power through the front but also thin enough that it doesn't just try to wheelie every time you hit the throttle.


Something does not add up. You are saying it wrong.
If its thinner in the front, then when turning which wheel has less resistance, the outside, then it will overspin the outer wheel, not the inner.

It does not make any sense, what dictates if power is transferred to the front or rear of vehicle is how thick the oil is on the front or rear diff.
The thickness of the center diff is somewhat as a LSD, tighter means thicker fluid, looser means lighter fluid.

If the front fluid is thinner than the rear fluid, then power transfer will move to the front
If the front fluid is thicker than the rear fluid, then power transfer will move to the back
The center diff oil thickness is like adjusting a LSD

 

slpcrf450x

Well-Known Member
Messages
177
Reaction score
87
Arrma RC's
Something does not add up. You are saying it wrong.
If its thinner in the front, then when turning which wheel has less resistance, the outside, then it will overspin the outer wheel, not the inner.

If you are turning and both tires maintain traction then yes the outside goes faster. That, however, is rarely the case, especially when hard on the throttle. When you are turning the weight of the vehicle is pushed towards the outside which unloads the inner tire, making it have less resistance than the outside. If enough throttle is applied in this situation the inner tire will break loose first.

It does not make any sense, what dictates if power is transferred to the front or rear of vehicle is how thick the oil is on the front or rear diff.
The thickness of the center diff is somewhat as a LSD, tighter means thicker fluid, looser means lighter fluid.

If the front fluid is thinner than the rear fluid, then power transfer will move to the front
If the front fluid is thicker than the rear fluid, then power transfer will move to the back
The center diff oil thickness is like adjusting a LSD]

The thickness of the fluid in all 3 diffs acts as a LSD. Thin fluid means free differential function, the thicker the fluid gets the more resistance it has acting more as a limited slip diff. The fluid thickness in ANY of the diffs controls how it transmits power to each side. Each differential sends power to 2 places. The front/rear diff sends power from the input drive line to the left, or right tire. The center diff sends power from the input (motor) to the front or rear drive line and has absolutely no differentiation between the left or right.

Read the link @83N provided.
 

jk420

Well-Known Member
Messages
314
Reaction score
98
Arrma RC's
  1. Granite
If you are turning and both tires maintain traction then yes the outside goes faster. That, however, is rarely the case, especially when hard on the throttle. When you are turning the weight of the vehicle is pushed towards the outside which unloads the inner tire, making it have less resistance than the outside. If enough throttle is applied in this situation the inner tire will break loose first.



The thickness of the fluid in all 3 diffs acts as a LSD. Thin fluid means free differential function, the thicker the fluid gets the more resistance it has acting more as a limited slip diff. The fluid thickness in ANY of the diffs controls how it transmits power to each side. Each differential sends power to 2 places. The front/rear diff sends power from the input drive line to the left, or right tire. The center diff sends power from the input (motor) to the front or rear drive line and has absolutely no differentiation between the left or right.

Read the link @83N provided.
Boom!
 

JvG

AliExpress Diamond Member đź’Ž
Premium Member
Build Thread Contributor
Messages
2,364
Reaction score
3,053
Location
The Netherlands, Europe
Arrma RC's
  1. BigRock 4x4
  2. Kraton 6s
  3. Kraton EXB
  4. Typhon 6s
If you are turning and both tires maintain traction then yes the outside goes faster. That, however, is rarely the case, especially when hard on the throttle. When you are turning the weight of the vehicle is pushed towards the outside which unloads the inner tire, making it have less resistance than the outside. If enough throttle is applied in this situation the inner tire will break loose first.



The thickness of the fluid in all 3 diffs acts as a LSD. Thin fluid means free differential function, the thicker the fluid gets the more resistance it has acting more as a limited slip diff. The fluid thickness in ANY of the diffs controls how it transmits power to each side. Each differential sends power to 2 places. The front/rear diff sends power from the input drive line to the left, or right tire. The center diff sends power from the input (motor) to the front or rear drive line and has absolutely no differentiation between the left or right.

Read the link @83N provided.
Correct, that's how it works. Center diff = front rear, front/rear diff = left/right. With the power of these cars indead the inner wheels will balloon when turning, especially offroad.
A fully locked diff has a 50/50 power distribition.
You can compare this with very heavy diff oil, like 1.000.000 cst, it's like glue. The lighter the diff oil the more the diff starts to distibute power to the side with less resistance.

For the Kraton on 6s i use 50/200/30
 
Top